Re: [RML] Disaster... leaking tank

Gary Lange (gwlange at stlnet.com)
Sun, 9 Nov 1997 14:20:12 -0600

yeah Cary you can always tell the newbies to the hobby by how they fix things.
:-) Just patching it over is certainly not a good fix. If it's not too big of
a tank I think you can be very safe in just pulling out one piece of glass and
replacing it, that is if you don't loosen up all of the other seals. I've had
quite a few tanks where I've just had to replace 1 pane and never had any
problems with the other sides leaking later.

Gary
----------
> From: caryho at ix.netcom.com
> To: rainbowfish at pcug.org.au
> Subject: Re: [RML] Disaster... leaking tank
> Date: Saturday, November 08, 1997 5:08 PM
>
> In The Dawn of the Third Age Jim Priest <cat at lascruces.com> woke me
> from my contemplation by writing:
>
> >When I did my repair, I didn't mess with the silicon between the glass
> >panels, I just did the entire bead...sides and bottom. Seems like you
> >would have to worry too much about your angles being just right if you
> >actually removed the glass panels from each other?
>
> When you have large all glass tanks, the seams eventually will get
> weak and pull away. It's best to tear the whole tank apart and rebuild
> if you get a leak. A leak is often a sign this is going to happen. It
> isn't really all that difficult, particularly if you have the frame to
> keep things aligned. Setting the glass up on the bottom piece will
> also help you to keep things square. Depending on the tank size, this
> is often a two person job. Its much better to do the job right, than
> to come home to a blown out panel with its associated clean up.
>
> Cary Hostrawser
>
> My Rainbowfish Home Page
> http://pw2.netcom.com/~caryho/home.html
>
> Rainbowfish Study Group Web Page
> http://home.stlnet.com/~gwlange/rainbowfish.index.html