[RML] Growing Tropical Fish Outdoors in Temperate climates

Gary Lange (rainbowfish4u2 at yahoo.com)
Thu, 14 Jul 2005 20:46:38 -0700 (PDT)

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Here's a question for you. I'm really interested in answers from those that live in temperate climates, that is us poor chaps that have to drag our fish in over the winter lest they die from the cold. Those that spell beer, XXXX can chime in too but we hate you :-) since our fish can't stay out year round. I'm really looking for 100 gallon size containers or larger though as I think the smaller systems end up heating/cooling too much and tend to have more problems if not handed carefully.
What type of (tropical) fish are you raising in your 100+ gallon ponds?
Especially rainbows but others too.
If you have fish out are you putting more than one species out at a time? Now I know responsible bow owners are only putting out one species or varities like one Pseudomugil, one Rhadinocentrus and one Melanotaenia, I'm looking for other things.

Do you put bows for the topwater, swordtails or other livebearer for the middle layer and perhaps something like a pleco or peacock gudgeon for the bottom layer? Do you have plants, lilies etc., to help keep the watercool and hide babies, and hold in the heat when the temps drop?
Above or below ground pond?
I think one of the ways to measure success for breedable fish is: How many more did you pull in versus put out for the summer?
What was your best fish (breeding success) you ever put out, what was your worst?
Anything to worry about besides zoning laws (ponds less than 18-24 inches in depth) racoons, cranes, curious children, mosquito spraying departments and wandering dogs?

I've put out various combinations of bows, LB's (Xiph) and bristlenose plecos and sometimes a bonus LB like Limia. I was wondering if there was anything else that I could add to this combo and still come up with a decent batch of bows & swords.

cheers,

Gary Lange
gwlange at sbcglobal.net
www.missouriaquariumsociety.org


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Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
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Here's a question for you.  I'm really interested in answers from those that live in temperate climates, that is us poor chaps that have to drag our fish in over the winter lest they die from the cold.  Those that spell beer, XXXX can chime in too but we hate you :-) since our fish can't stay out year round.  I'm really looking for 100 gallon size containers or larger though as I think the smaller systems end up heating/cooling too much and tend to have more problems if not handed carefully. 
What type of (tropical) fish are you raising in your 100+ gallon ponds? 
Especially rainbows but others too. 
If you have fish out are you putting more than one species out at a time?  Now I know responsible bow owners are only putting out one species or varities like one Pseudomugil, one Rhadinocentrus and one Melanotaenia, I'm looking for other things. 
 
Do you put bows for the topwater, swordtails or other livebearer for the middle layer and perhaps something like a pleco or peacock gudgeon for the bottom layer?  Do you have plants, lilies etc., to help keep the watercool and hide babies, and hold in the heat when the temps drop? 
Above or below ground pond? 
I think one of the ways to measure success for breedable fish is: How many more did you pull in versus put out for the summer? 
What was your best fish (breeding success) you ever put out, what was your worst? 
Anything to worry about besides zoning laws (ponds less than 18-24 inches in depth) racoons, cranes, curious children, mosquito spraying departments and wandering dogs? 
 
I've put out various combinations of bows, LB's (Xiph) and bristlenose plecos and sometimes a bonus LB like Limia.  I was wondering if there was anything else that I could add to this combo and still come up with a decent batch of bows & swords.
 
cheers,
 
Gary Lange
gwlange at sbcglobal.net
www.missouriaquariumsociety.org


Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page --0-513525893-1121399198=:56473--