[RML] Red-finned Blue-eyes

Adrian R. Tappin (atappin at ecn.net.au)
Mon, 02 Feb 1998 06:33:44 +1000

At 14:39 1/02/98 GMT, Cary wrote:

>On related note, what is the status of S. vermeilipinnis in the hobby
>today? If those few keepers of this species around the world had been
>in closer contact, it may have stood a better chance in the hobby. We
>may have noticed the fertility problems quicker and had a bit more
>time to find a solution. We still have too many species in the gray
>area of our knowledge. Are they doing well, or are they slowly
>disappearing? If we're loosing a species in North America, it would
>not be as large a problem if it is plentiful in Europe or Australia.

As far as I know there are no populations of Redfins Blue-eyes outside of
Australia - all have now been lost. Within Australia there are I think only
2 captive populations left. This past spring season I actually had a better
results and am currently rasing about 50 young. However, I also lost almost
all of my oldest generation during the hot weather this summer for what
reason I don't really know?

To comment of Robs observation:

"Having said that I am also a realist. I believe that humans are
destined to
manage the entire biosphere in order to survive. Although it is
unlikely I
will ever have the resources to prove it, I believe that human
activities
have already modified the behaviour of red-finned blue-eyes in their
natural
environment."

Its probably true to say that the Redfin Blue-eyes were destined for
extinction anyway if we assume correctly that they are a remnant population
of species that existed when conditions were more suitable to their
survival. I think all of us would agreed that a semi-desert habitat is an
unlikely habitat for a blue-eye. The population at Aramac are no doubt the
last of the species and would or will eventually die out. So by the very
nature of trying to preserve this species in the wild we may in fact be
interfering with their natural selection and the balance of nature. The road
to extinction is probably already genetically implanted in the species and
that could explain why their maintenance in captivity has proven to be so
difficult.

Adrian.

...............................................................
Adrian R. Tappin
"Home of the Rainbowfish"
http://www.ecn.net.au/~atappin/home.htm
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