[acn-l] [Fwd: FYI: 1997 Most Endangered Rivers in North America]

Rhonda Wilson (rhondawi at sprynet.com)
Mon, 13 Oct 1997 13:09:16 -0700

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I recieved this as a forwarded message the other day. I thought there
might be some interest here also.

Rhonda

> 1997 Most Endangered Rivers in North America
>
> Press release by American Rivers
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> April 1997
>
> 1. Missouri River (MT, ND, SD, KS, IA, NE, MO): dams, channelization to
> support uneconomic commercial navigation: To support navigation, the
> Army Corps of Engineers has waged a 50-year-long campaign to manage and
> control this once wild, dynamic waterway. As a result, the river has
> been dramatically altered; it has been shortened by almost 130 miles,
> and it is now one-third its original width. In addition, 98-percent of
> sandbars and islands are gone, and one-fifth of the river's native
> species are endangered. The end result of these efforts: a handful of
> barge operators now ship an infinitesimal amount of grain -- one-tenth
> of one percent of the grain grown in four states (Missouri, Iowa,
> Kansas, Nebraska) along the Missouri.
>
> 2. Upper Hudson River (NY): PCB contamination: The Upper Hudson River is
> believed to be the largest PCB contamination site in the U.S., the
> source of which is General Electric Company (GE). PCBs are distributed
> over 190 miles of the Hudson River in river bottom sediments. New
> studies show that our 20-year policy of leaving the PCBs in place in the
> river has failed; PCBs are still being released into the environment,
> damaging the river, and threatening public health and safety.
>
> 3. White Salmon River (WA): hydroelectric dam: Threatening one of the
> gems if the northwest is one dam, the Condit Dam built in 1913, which is
> the only barrier to migrating fish in the White Salmon. After a
> 50-year-long free ride, the dam owner still refuses to either install
> fish passage or remove the dam and has actually threatened to require to
> do so. As a result, the White Salmon is known as the river with the
> "deadbeat dam."
>
> 4. San Joaquin River (CA): floodplain development, agricultural run-off:
> Despite record floods this year, commercial and residential development
> in the floodplains has resumed -- even on sites that were under water
> during the recent flooding. More than 58,000 homes are planned or under
> construction in flood-prone areas. Billions of tax dollars are being
> misspent on flood control projects while losses rise because of rapid
> urbanization in flood-prone areas. Flood losses from the 1997 flood, the
> costliest in California's history, may top $2 billion.
>
> 5. Wolf River (WI): proposed mine: The Wolf, one of the last wild
> riverways in the Midwest and a part of the National Wild and Scenic
> Rivers System, faces imminent and permanent ruin by a huge proposed
> zinc/copper mine. Often called one of Wisconsin's most beautiful rivers,
> the Wolf is threatened by an estimated 44 million tons of mine waste
> laced with mercury, lead, zinc, arsenic and sulfuric acid.
>
> 6. Pinto Creek (AZ): proposed mine: Cambior, Inc., a Canadian mining
> company with a notorious environmental record, including the 1995 mining
> disaster in Guyana, is proposing to open a copper mine literally in the
> middle of Pinto creek, one of the last intact stream systems left in the
> Sonoran desert.
>
> 7. Potomac River (WV, PA, MD, VA, DC): run-off from industrial poultry
> production, cattle, feedlots, suburban development: Held up as a river
> restoration success story, the Potomac faces two major threats: 1) the
> widescale expansion of industrialized poultry farms -- which support 95
> million birds -- and cattle feedlots in the Potomac headwaters. This
> industry threatens local drinking water supplies and potentially the
> drinking water for the Washington, D.C. area; and 2) Chapman's Landing:
> a proposed residential and commercial development which would convert
> riparian forest into a sprawling city the size of Annapolis, the capital
> of Maryland.
>
> 8. Mill Creek (OH): named the Most Endangered Urban River because of
> urban run-off, industrial waste: The most endangered urban river in the
> country, Mill Creek is one of the best examples of death by a thousand
> cuts. It is threatened by run-off from toxic waster sites, city streets
> and sewage overflow. The state of Ohio now wants to downgrade the formal
> status of the river, effectively saying the river has no value and no
> restoration potential.
>
> 9. Lower Colorado River (AZ, NV, CA): dewatering to service growing
> urban populations: The Lower Colorado is falling victim to the rush by
> southwest states to replenish depleted water supplies as population
> explodes and agricultural needs increase throughout the area. For the
> first time, demand for water will exceed the river's supply, stripping
> the fragile ecosystem of much of the water that sustains it. As
> surrounding states vie for the Colorado's waters, the needs of fish and
> other aquatic species are often ignored.
>
> 10. Tennessee River (TN, AL, MS, KY): TVA's elimination of environmental
> responsibilities: Important watershed protection efforts of the
> Tennessee River will end if the Tennessee Valley Authority succeeds in
> eliminating its environmental responsibilities so that it can compete in
> a new de-regulated electricity marketplace. These responsibilities have
> been part of the TVA's mandate since 1933.
>

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From: "Griffiths, Richard" <rgriffit at visa.com>
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Subject: FYI: 1997 Most Endangered Rivers in North America
Date: Wed, 8 Oct 1997 11:47:58 -0700
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1997 Most Endangered Rivers in North America

Press release by American Rivers
------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 1997

1. Missouri River (MT, ND, SD, KS, IA, NE, MO): dams, channelization to
support uneconomic commercial navigation: To support navigation, the
Army Corps of Engineers has waged a 50-year-long campaign to manage and
control this once wild, dynamic waterway. As a result, the river has
been dramatically altered; it has been shortened by almost 130 miles,
and it is now one-third its original width. In addition, 98-percent of
sandbars and islands are gone, and one-fifth of the river's native
species are endangered. The end result of these efforts: a handful of
barge operators now ship an infinitesimal amount of grain -- one-tenth
of one percent of the grain grown in four states (Missouri, Iowa,
Kansas, Nebraska) along the Missouri.

2. Upper Hudson River (NY): PCB contamination: The Upper Hudson River is
believed to be the largest PCB contamination site in the U.S., the
source of which is General Electric Company (GE). PCBs are distributed
over 190 miles of the Hudson River in river bottom sediments. New
studies show that our 20-year policy of leaving the PCBs in place in the
river has failed; PCBs are still being released into the environment,
damaging the river, and threatening public health and safety.

3. White Salmon River (WA): hydroelectric dam: Threatening one of the
gems if the northwest is one dam, the Condit Dam built in 1913, which is
the only barrier to migrating fish in the White Salmon. After a
50-year-long free ride, the dam owner still refuses to either install
fish passage or remove the dam and has actually threatened to require to
do so. As a result, the White Salmon is known as the river with the
"deadbeat dam."

4. San Joaquin River (CA): floodplain development, agricultural run-off:
Despite record floods this year, commercial and residential development
in the floodplains has resumed -- even on sites that were under water
during the recent flooding. More than 58,000 homes are planned or under
construction in flood-prone areas. Billions of tax dollars are being
misspent on flood control projects while losses rise because of rapid
urbanization in flood-prone areas. Flood losses from the 1997 flood, the
costliest in California's history, may top $2 billion.

5. Wolf River (WI): proposed mine: The Wolf, one of the last wild
riverways in the Midwest and a part of the National Wild and Scenic
Rivers System, faces imminent and permanent ruin by a huge proposed
zinc/copper mine. Often called one of Wisconsin's most beautiful rivers,
the Wolf is threatened by an estimated 44 million tons of mine waste
laced with mercury, lead, zinc, arsenic and sulfuric acid.

6. Pinto Creek (AZ): proposed mine: Cambior, Inc., a Canadian mining
company with a notorious environmental record, including the 1995 mining
disaster in Guyana, is proposing to open a copper mine literally in the
middle of Pinto creek, one of the last intact stream systems left in the
Sonoran desert.

7. Potomac River (WV, PA, MD, VA, DC): run-off from industrial poultry
production, cattle, feedlots, suburban development: Held up as a river
restoration success story, the Potomac faces two major threats: 1) the
widescale expansion of industrialized poultry farms -- which support 95
million birds -- and cattle feedlots in the Potomac headwaters. This
industry threatens local drinking water supplies and potentially the
drinking water for the Washington, D.C. area; and 2) Chapman's Landing:
a proposed residential and commercial development which would convert
riparian forest into a sprawling city the size of Annapolis, the capital
of Maryland.

8. Mill Creek (OH): named the Most Endangered Urban River because of
urban run-off, industrial waste: The most endangered urban river in the
country, Mill Creek is one of the best examples of death by a thousand
cuts. It is threatened by run-off from toxic waster sites, city streets
and sewage overflow. The state of Ohio now wants to downgrade the formal
status of the river, effectively saying the river has no value and no
restoration potential.

9. Lower Colorado River (AZ, NV, CA): dewatering to service growing
urban populations: The Lower Colorado is falling victim to the rush by
southwest states to replenish depleted water supplies as population
explodes and agricultural needs increase throughout the area. For the
first time, demand for water will exceed the river's supply, stripping
the fragile ecosystem of much of the water that sustains it. As
surrounding states vie for the Colorado's waters, the needs of fish and
other aquatic species are often ignored.

10. Tennessee River (TN, AL, MS, KY): TVA's elimination of environmental
responsibilities: Important watershed protection efforts of the
Tennessee River will end if the Tennessee Valley Authority succeeds in
eliminating its environmental responsibilities so that it can compete in
a new de-regulated electricity marketplace. These responsibilities have
been part of the TVA's mandate since 1933.

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