[acn-l] ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 10/20/00 (Part 2 of 2)<~~ (fwd)

PETER.UNMACK at asu.edu
Wed, 25 Oct 2000 09:14:41 -0700 (MST)

From: FISH1IFR at aol.com
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2000 14:00:20 EDT
Subject: ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 10/20/00 (Part 2 of 2)<~~
To: AFS at wyoming.com, ACN-L at pinetree.org, crab-l at ios.bc.ca,
fishhabitat at mail.orst.edu, salmon at riverdale.k12.or.us

<<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>>><<
~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 10/20/00 (Part 2 of 2)<~~
<<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>>><<
A WEEKLY QUOTA OF FISHERY SHORTS CAUGHT AND
LANDED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR FISHERIES RESOURCES
AND THE PACIFIC COAST FEDERATION OF FISHERMEN'S
ASSOCIATIONS

VOL 2, NO. 16 20 October 2000
<<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>>><<
CONTINUED FROM PART 1

2:16/16. U.S.-CANADIAN DAM PROJECT THREATENS
BELIZE TROPICAL FOREST: A Canadian development company,
Fortis Incorporated and the U.S. utility, Duke Energy International, are
planning a massive hydroelectric project that would "obliterate" one of
Central America's most important "undisturbed tropical floodplain
habitats," the Macal River in Belize. The area is part of the "government
protected" Chiqui Forest Reserve and contains "unmatched" biodiversity
including a rare subspecies of scarlet macaw, jaguars,
ocelots, river otters, spider monkeys and Morelet's crocodile, many of
which have already been extirpated from former habitat by logging and
development. Tropical forests provide critical habitat and nutrients for
freshwater and coastal marine fishes. For more information, go to:
www.nrdc.org/wildlife/habitat/belize.asp

2:16/17. ICELANDIC CONDEMNATION OF ITQs: In the
October issue of Commercial Fisheries News is a report on the Icelandic
condemnation of individual transferrable fishing quotas (ITQs) at a New
England fisheries forum. For sixteen years, Iceland had an ITQ system
in place before it was thrown out on 5 January of this year (see Sublegals,
14 Jan 00). According to an Icelandic spokesman at the forum, ITQs led
to "plummeting populations in fishing villages, declining groundfish
catches, increased fuel consumption, huge discard rates, and higher
consumer prices." To view the article and an accompanying reports on
ITQs, go to the CFN website at: www.fish-news.com .

2:16/18. U.S. ANNOUNCES EMBARGO OF SPANISH TUNA
OVER DOLPHIN KILLS: In the 16 October Federal Register, the U.S.
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced that effective 6
October an embargo is in effect for the Government of Spain under the
U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). This embargoes the
importation into the United States of yellowfin tuna and yellowfin tuna
products harvested in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (ETP) after 3
March 1999 by Spanish-flag purse seine vessels or vessels operating
under Spanish jurisdiction and all other yellowfin tuna harvested by
purse seine in the ETP exported from Spain. This embargo determination
was made after NMFS considered documentary evidence submitted by the
Government of Spain and obtained from the Inter-American Tropical
Tuna Commission (IATTC). Copies of this notice may be obtained by
writing to Regional Administrator, Southwest Region, NMFS, 501 West
Ocean Boulevard, Suite 4200, Long Beach, CA 90802-4213; Phone
(562) 980-4000.

2:16/19. OCTOBER HARPER'S AND ATLANTIC ARTICLES
ON ELECTRIC DEREGULATION AND SALMON
RESTORATION: The October issue of Harper's Magazine, features an
article by Alan Weisman, "Power Trip: The Coming Darkness of
Electricity" (pp.76-85) that will be of interest to fishing group concerned
with the impact of the deregulation/privatization of hydro-electric
facilities on rivers and fish. The problems posed by deregulation, of
course, are not limited solely to fisheries, but affect water delivery,
pollution and electric rates. To view the article, go to Harper's website
at: http://www.harpers.org.

The October issue of The Atlantic Monthly, meanwhile, features an
essay by James Fallows, "Saving Salmon or Seattle?" where he points out
that "the Northwest is obsessed with the fate of salmon - except that, as
is often true, the battle is really over how people want to live" (pp. 20-
26). To view the article go to The Atlantic Monthly's website at:
www.theatlantic.com.

2:16/20. KILLER WHALES BLAMED FOR DECLINE OF
ALASKAN SEA OTTERS: In a 10 October feature, MSNBC reported
marine biologists are blaming orcas for taking a "heavy toll" on sea otters
in the Aleutian Islands, where otter numbers "have dropped 70% since 1992
and at least 95% since the 1980s." The scientists speculate that the orcas
have turned to the sea otters "because their normal prey sea lions and fur
seals are in short supply." Steller sea lions have also declined 80% since
the 1980s and experts believe there is a "massive ecological shift in the
North Pacific and Bering Sea" in the kinds of fish available due to
"expanding fisheries, increases in ocean temperatures and a depletion of
large whales."

The feature on the depletion of sea otters allegedly due to killer whale
predation, followed on a 6 October report by MSNBC and the Associated
Press that a petition to add orcas in the Pacific Northwest to the
Endangered Species Act (ESA) list is expected to be submitted "later this
month by a coalition of scientists and environmentalists." Of special
concern is one of three populations, the southern residents whose
numbers have declined from 98 five years ago to 82 with eight dying
"last year alone." Scientists believe that pollutants, especially from
Superfund toxic waste sites and the decline of salmon runs are to blame.
"Some studies estimate that the fish make up 90% of their diet."

2:16/21. NMFS PROPOSES REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT
THE PFMC'S AMENDMENT 14 TO THE PACIFIC COAST
SALMON PLAN: The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
announced in today's Federal Register, 20 October, that it is proposing
regulations to implement portions of Amendment 14 to the Fishery
Management Plan for Commercial and Recreational Salmon Fisheries off
the Coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California (Salmon FMP).
Amendment 14, which was submitted by the Pacific Fishery Management
Council (PFMC) on 12 June to the Secretary of Commerce for review
and approval, is intended to bring the Salmon FMP into compliance with
the Sustainable Fisheries Act's (SFA) 1996 amendments to the
Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation & Management Act
(Magnuson-Stevens Act). Amendment 14 includes designation of
essential fish habitat (EFH) and new requirements to reduce bycatch, and
rebuild salmon stocks. This proposed rule to implement Amendment 14
would make minor changes to language regarding escapement and
management goals; implement a new recreational allocation to the Port
of La Push and adjust the Neah Bay allocation accordingly; add
preseason flexibility for recreational port allocations north of Cape
Falcon; and implement preseason flexibility in setting recreational port
allocation or recreational and commercial allocations North of Cape
Falcon to take advantage of selective fishing opportunities for marked
hatchery fish. Comments must be submitted in writing by 24 December;
they should be sent to: Dr. Rebecca Lent, Regional Administrator,
Southwest Region, NMFS, 501 West Ocean Boulevard, Suite 4200, Long
Beach, CA 90802-4213; Fax: (562) 980-4018.

Copies of Amendment 14 and the final supplemental environmental
impact statement (FSEIS)/regulatory impact review (RIR)/initial
regulatory flexibility analysis (IRFA), along with the appendices and the
Review of 1999 Ocean Salmon Fisheries are available from Dr. Donald
O. McIsaac, Executive Director, Pacific Fishery Management Council,
2130 SW Fifth Avenue, Suite 224, Portland, OR 97201; or visit the
PFMC website at: http://www.pcouncil.org.

2:16/21. NATIONAL MPA CENTER ESTABLISHED AT
SANTA CRUZ: On 17 October, U.S. Commerce Secretary Norman
Mineta announced the establishment of the Center for Marine Protected
Area Science to be headquartered at the National Marine Fisheries
Service's new laboratory at Santa Cruz, on Monterey Bay in California.
The announcement was made during the dedication ceremonies for the
new NMFS facility (see Sublegals, 2:15/11) sited with the Long Marine
Laboratory at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

The new center is intended to carry out the national initiative on
marine protected areas (MPAs), pursuant to President Clinton's 26 May
Executive Order 13158 to strengthen the protection of U.S. ocean and
coastal resources, and "will work with public and private partners to
develop and disseminate the information, tools and strategies needed to
design and effectively manage the national system of MPAs." Dr.
Charles M. Wahle, a NOAA veteran and Monterey Bay native, has been
named the Acting Director of the new center. For more information, he
may be contacted by e-mail at: charles.wahle at noaa.gov.

2:16/22. PFMC HIGHLY MIGRATORY SPECIES TEAM TO
MEET: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's (PFMC) Highly
Migratory Species Plan Development Team (HMSPDT) will hold a work
session which is open to the public from Tuesday, 14November , beginning
at 0800 HRS through Thursday, 16November. The work session will be
held in the large conference room at NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science
Center, 8604 La Jolla Shores Drive, Room D-203, La Jolla, CA
92038-0271; telephone: (619) 546-7000. For more information, visit the
PFMC website at: http://www.pcouncil.org.

2:16/23. CLINTON SIGNS TREATY ON SEA TURTLES: U.S.
President Bill Clinton has signed the treaty requiring signatory countries
to take measures to prevent sea turtles from being caught and killed in
shrimp trawl nets. "This treaty is the first international agreement
dedicated solely to raising standards for the protection of sea turtles,"
Clinton said. "Effective conservation measures depend on close
international cooperation. This treaty fosters that cooperation and serves
as a model for others focused on conserving the world's most endangered
species." The Senate ratified the treaty on 20 September (see Sublegals,
2:12/18).

The World Trade Organization (WTO), however, is likely watching.
The WTO, which has been given authority by member nations, including
the U.S., to overturn national laws, ruled in the Spring of 1999 against
a U.S. law that would have banned shrimp imports from countries that
did not use turtle excluder devices (TEDs) or otherwise protect sea
turtles from "incidental death in shrimp trawl nets," according to the law.
"Shrimp from states not complying is subject to embargo," the law states.
The State Department has since revised the law's language to create the
Inter-American Convention for the Protection & Conservation of Sea
Turtles which is substantially weaker than the law it replaces because it
focuses on the Americas and is a voluntary agreement.

The treaty must be ratified by eight countries. Eleven countries signed
the treaty for consideration in 1996, and five have fully ratified it: Brazil,
Costa Rica, Peru, Venezuela and Mexico. Ecuador is also on it way, as
is Honduras, sources say. All eight species of sea turtles are threatened
with extinction. According to the National Research Council, shrimp
trawl nets are the greatest factor in sea turtles deaths.

NEWS, COMMENTS, CORRECTIONS: Submit your news items,
comments or any corrections to Natasha Benjamin, Editor at:
ifrfish at aol.com or call the IFR office with the news and a source at
either: (415) 561-FISH (Southwest Office) or (541) 689-2000 (Northwest
Office).
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