[acn-l] ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 10/6/00<~~ (fwd)

PETER.UNMACK at asu.edu
Mon, 09 Oct 2000 15:35:59 -0700 (MST)

From: FISH1IFR at aol.com
Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2000 01:33:35 EDT
Subject: ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 10/6/00<~~
To: AFS at wyoming.com, ACN-L at pinetree.org, crab-l at ios.bc.ca,
FishingForum at onelist.com, fishhabitat at mail.orst.edu,
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sub2-14.txt
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~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 10/6/00<~~
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A WEEKLY QUOTA OF FISHERY SHORTS CAUGHT AND
LANDED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR FISHERIES RESOURCES
AND THE PACIFIC COAST FEDERATION OF FISHERMEN'S
ASSOCIATIONS

VOL 1, NO. 14 6 OCTOBER 2000
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2:14/01. CALIFORNIA BOARD OF FORESTRY INACTION
KEEPS SALMON PROTECTION RULES: The California Board of
Forestry, in Sacramento hearings on 3-4 October on controversial timber
industry proposed alternative rules, failed to adopt even its own "Watershed
Evaluation and Mitigation Addendum (WEMA)" draft rules in a deadlocked
Board. This means the current Interim Rules providing at least some
additional protections for salmon and steelhead will remain in effect for at
least another year. Option B of the proposed WEMA rules, proposed by the
timber industry, was designed to exempt the timber industry from those
Interim Rules. The Interim Rules were adopted on an emergency basis last
year to protect ESA listed coho salmon and steelhead streams. Option A (the
Board's option) and Option C would also have provided exemptions from
these Interim Rules, but to a much lesser extent. On a deeply split vote,
there
were 4 votes to adopt the Industry WEMA proposals, but 3 votes to take no
action, and the motion failed (Board approval required 5 affirmative votes).
This also means that even if later rule changes are adopted, they could not go
into effect before 2002 (see Sublegals 2:13/01). State Assembly Speaker Fred
Keeley strongly opposed adopting any of the options, as did State Senator
Byron Sher in separate letters (see the Sher letter on the PCFFA web site at:
http://www.pond.net/~pcffa/sherltr.htm). PCFFA's Glen Spain also testified
against adoption of any of the WEMA options, at least until a watershed
analysis process has been much better worked out. Board inaction pushes any
potential rule-making well into next year. For a copy of the Board's
proposed rule changes go to:
http://www.fire.ca.gov/bof/board/board_proposed_rule_packages.html.

2:14/02. CARA PACKAGE MINUS PIECES FOLDED INTO US
INTERIOR APPROPRIATIONS BILL: The basic language of the bi-
partisan $3 billion/year Conservation & Reinvestment Act (CARA) (see
Sublegals 2:02/01& 2:04/02) from H.R. 701has now been folded into the
Department of Interior Appropriations Bill (HR 4578). On 3 October, the
U.S. House of Representatives passed the Interior Appropriations bill by a
348-69 vote, and on 5 October the Senate approved the bill by 83-13. The
bill now goes to the President for signature, which is expected now that a
number of anti-environmental "riders" have been removed. However, some
objectionable provisions still remain. Title VIII, "Land Conservation,
Preservation and Infrastructure Improvement" contains a six-year program
that provides funds for conservation and recreation programs including many
of the elements of the more sweeping CARA legislation. However, the
funding level is only one-half of that proposed in CARA and with no
certainty of commitment to fund CARA's programs beyond six years. Also,
the Interior bill version does not guarantee any new funding for CARA's
enumerated programs. As a result, many of those programs, particularly
those that have been under funded or never funded in the past, could receive
little or no funding at all in the future. The CARA program promises several
hundred million dollars for badly needed coastal protection and restoration
programs and is supported by more than 5000 organizations. For details of
the bill and to track the appropriations process generally see the Library of
Congress THOMAS index at: http://thomas.loc.gov .

2:14/03. SENATOR GORTON GETS HIS SALMON RIDER, ALSO
BACKS RETURN TO MANDATORY TIMBER CUTS: Blocked by his
colleagues from imposing a rider muzzling agency analysis of Snake River
dam removal options (see Sublegals 2:13/15), Senator Slade Gorton did get
the following language included in the Energy and Water Appropriations
Conference Report to accompany H.R. 4733: "[N]o part of any appropriation
contained in this Act shall be expended or obligated to begin Phase II of the
John Day Drawdown study or to initiate a study of the drawdown of McNary
Dam unless authorized by law." However, though these studies may play a
role in Columbia River restoration analysis in the future, the Administration
has no plans to conduct such studies at the present time so his rider is
widely
seen as mere political posturing.

In another arena, Senator Gorton also was instrumental in inserting a
provision in the Interior Appropriations bill (H.R. 4578) requiring the US
Forest Service to sell no less than 3.6 billion board feet of timber from
federal lands in Fiscal Year 2001, according to the 5 October edition of The
Oregonian (see: http://www.oregonlive.com/outdoors/index.ssf?/news/
oregonian/00/10/lc_51timbr05.frame). Mandatory timber targets, often
adopted by Congress at the request of the timber industry in the past, have
been discredited by scientists as failing to take resource protection into
account and have not been common in recent years. The federal timber sales
program is also highly subsidized, with the timber industry bearing only a
very small fraction of actual costs, and results in considerable watershed
damage. Though it is not specified in the rider which regions of the country
would be used to generate mandatory timber volumes, the burden usually falls
on western forests where salmon and other species of wildlife are the most at
risk. In the past mandatory timber targets have caused the agencies to
short-circuit environmental protections for salmon. Senator Gorton was also
the author of the infamous "timber salvage rider" in 1996 which did just that,
setting mandatory timber targets which overrode all environmental laws, and
the resulting timber sales contributed substantially to current salmon
declines
(see "Fishermen Get Shafted by the 'Salvage Rider'" at:
http://www.pond.net/~pcffa/fn-mar96.htm.

2:14/04. STRONG ESA REAUTHORIZATION BILL INTRODUCED IN
SENATE: Senator Lautenberg and group of U.S. Senators introduced a strong
Endangered Species Act reauthorization bill this week, setting a positive
tone
for next year's debate on one of the nation's most important environmental
laws. The Endangered Species Recovery Act (ESRA), S.3156, was
introduced by Senator Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) and ten other Senators: Boxer
(D-CA), Dodd (D-CT), Kennedy (D-MA), Kerry (D-MA), Leahy (D-VT),
Moynihan, (D-NY), Reed (D-RI), Schumer (D-NY), Torricelli (D-NJ), and
Wellstone (D-MN). A companion bill in the House (H.R. 960) has more than
100 bipartisan cosponsors, far more than its rival bill authored by
Congressmen Don Young and Richard Pombo (H.R. 3160, with only 41
co-sponsors) which would seriously erode the current law. The ESA has
become instrumental in salmon restoration efforts coastwide (see "Why
Fishermen Need the ESA," http://www.pond.net/~pcffa/fn-jan95.htm). The
ESRA includes a tax incentives program to reward landowners for voluntary
conservation measures as well as many other changes to the current ESA long
endorsed by PCFFA and other fishing organizations (see "A Fishermen's
Agenda for the ESA," http://www.pond.net/~pcffa/fn-dec95.htm). Information
on the two ESRA bills can be found at:
http://www.stopextinction.org/alert1.html.

2:14/05. EXXON VALDEZ OIL SPILL AWARD STANDS FOR
NOW: On 3 October, the US Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal by the
Exxon Corporation from the lower court's decision upholding a $5 billion
punitive damages award against the company for the Exxon Valdez oil spill
in Prince William Sound, Alaska, in 1989. The 11 million gallon crude oil
spill, largest in the nation's history, polluted more than 1,000 miles of
shoreline, killed tens of thousands of seabirds and devastated the state's
fisheries for many years. Alaska's marine ecosystem has never completely
recovered, and Exxon was eventually tried and fined that amount by the jury,
but has not yet paid any of the fine. However, the ruling does not yet mean
Exxon will have to pay soon, as it has several other appeals pending. The
Anchorage Daily News is also running a series of articles on the legacy of the
Exxon Valdez oil spill, available at:
http://www.adn.com/adn/evos/pgs/intro.html.

2:14/06. SARDINES BACK TO NORTHWEST IN RECORD
NUMBERS: The 3 October Oregonian reports that sardine harvests in
Astoria, Oregon are topping 16.6 million pounds, and that sardines are back
in numbers not seen since the fishing heydays of the 1940's. Biologists are
optimistic that better understanding of natural population cycles of the fish
can avoid the massive die-offs that devastated the sardine industry 60 years
ago. Some biologists believe that ocean conditions and natural long-term
population cycles of the sardine combine to produce a 60-year cycle, with
abundance naturally followed by declines that have little to do with fishing.
See: http://www.oregonlive.com/outdoors/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/
00/10/nw_31sard03.frame.

2:14/07. FISH EXPO COMING UP SOON: FISH EXPO and
WorkBoat Northwest is the west coast's oldest and largest commercial
fishing convention, and this year will take place in the Seattle Convention
Center 16-18 November. To register you can call (800)454-3005 or via:
http://www.fishexposeattle.com to register online. Many commercial
fishermen's organizations also have their annual meetings in conjunction with
FISH EXPO.

2:14/08. REQUEST TO DREDGE COLUMBIA DENIED: The States
of Oregon and Washington have both denied US Army Corps of Engineers
requests for permits to deepened the 103-mile stretch of the Columbia River
from Portland to Astoria. The denial came only five weeks after the National
Marine Fisheries Service withdrew its previous Biological Opinion
approving the project, fearing that dredging would destroy important salmon
habitat in the lower Columbia estuary. Environmental officials from the two
states disagree with the Corps and the Ports of Vancouver and Portland,
advocates of the dredging program, who say the massive dredging will cause
no environmental harm, and believe the project may have serious impacts on
ESA listed salmonids, which use the estuary for part of their lifecycle.
Washington is also worried about loss of beach sand from natural sediments
loads in the estuary leading to increased beach erosion. The Columbia River
dams have cut natural sediment loads in the estuary to about one-third
historic conditions. For more information see: http://www.oregonlive.com/
outdoors/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/00/09/lc_71dredg30.frame

2:14/09. OREGON OCEAN POLICY ADVISORY COUNCIL TO
CONSIDER MARINE PROTECTED AREAS: The Oregon Ocean Policy
Advisory Council (OPAC) is hosting a meeting 26-27 October, at the
Hatfield Marine Science Center Auditorium from 10:30 AM Thursday to 2
PM Friday to discuss the issue of marine protected areas (MPAs) in Oregon.
Oregon's Governor Kitzhaber has requested advice from OPAC in light of
President Clinton's 26 May Executive Order 13158 on the subject, and in
light of California's Marine Life Protection Act which established a process
for managing and assessing MPAs in California. A Pacific Fisheries
Management Council (PFMC) advisory committee on marine protected areas
recently recommended Council action on MPAs, and the Council's
Groundfish Fishery Strategic Plan recommends MPAs for groundfish
management (available from: http://www.pcouncil.org). Oregon's only
marine reserve is 30 acres. For more information on the meeting contact the
Ocean Policy Advisory Council, 800 NE Oregon Street, #18, Portland, OR
97232 (503)731-4065 x27. Also see the PCFFA policy Statement on MPAs
at: http://www.pond.net/~pcffa/mpa3.htm.

2:14/10. PACIFIC FISHERY MANAGEMENT COUNCIL MEETING
DATES: The full Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC)
and its advisory committees will be meeting from 30 October to 3 November
in Vancouver, Washington, at the Red Lion Hotel at the Quay, 100 Columbia
Street, Vancouver, Washington. Adoption of management measures for
2001 groundfish fisheries will be the main topic. Prior to the main PFMC
meeting, the Ad-Hoc Allocation Committee will meet 24-25 October starting
0800 at the Doubletree Hotel, Coos Bay Room, 310 SW Lincoln Ave.,
Portland, Oregon to develop recommendations for allocations and other
management measures associated with rebuilding plans for canary rockfish,
cowcod and other overfished species. Contact Jim Glock (503)326-6352 for
more information. The Council's Coastal Pelagic Species Management
Team and Coastal Pelagic Species Advisory Subpanel will also be holding
a joint work session starting 1000 on 17-18 October at the National Marine
Fisheries Service Southwest Regional Office, 501 West Ocean Blvd., Suite
4200, Long Beach, California. For more information on these and other
Council activities, contact the PFMC office at (503)326-6352 or see:
http://www.pcouncil.org.

2:14/11. PACIFIC COUNCIL REQUESTS NOMINATIONS TO
ADVISORY BODIES: The Pacific Fishery Management Council is taking
nominations to four of its key advisory committees: The Coastal Pelagic
Species, the Groundfish Advisory, the Highly Migratory Species and the
Salmon Advisory Subpanels. Nominations must be received by 17 October.
Service on these Subpanels is for three years and is very important in
assuring that Council actions and management decisions are well informed.
For more information on these and other Council activities, contact the
PFMC office at (503)326-6352 or see: http://www.pcouncil.org.

2:14/12. PACIFIC COUNCIL ADOPTS GROUNDFISH
STRATEGIC PLAN: The Pacific Fisheries Management Council (PFMC)
recently adopted, by unanimous vote, a Strategic Plan for the west coast
groundfish fishery to guide future management plans and objectives. The
Plan includes reduction of the commercial fleet by at least 50 percent,
closing
several open access area with limited entry programs, and using marine
protected areas to protect key groundfish nursery grounds. The Plan
documents will be released on 10 October and available from the Council
office at 2130 SW Fifth Avenue, Suite 224, Portland, Oregon 97201
(503)326-6352 and posted on its web site at: http://www.pcouncil.org.

2:14/13. CALIFORNIA FISH & GAME GROUNDFISH AND
NEARSHORE FISHERIES MEETINGS: Three meetings have been
scheduled to receive public input on proposed management measures
affecting California groundfish and nearshore fisheries commencing 1
January, 2001. The proposals are under consideration by the California Fish
and Game Commission and the Pacific Fishery Management Council.
Meetings are scheduled as follows: 10 October 0900-1500 at the Sacramento
Convention Center, 1030 15th Street, Room 103, Sacramento, CA; 11
October 1900-2200, San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors
Chambers, 1035 Palm Street, Second Floor, San Luis Obispo, CA; 19
October 1900-2200, Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute, Shedd Auditorium,
2595 Ingraham Street, San Diego, CA. For more information contact the
California Department of Fish & Game, 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento,
California 95814 (916)653-6281.

2:14/14. RULE PROPOSED TO SET WASHINGTON'S SKAGIT
RIVER INSTREAM FLOWS: A public workshop and informational
meeting (not a formal hearing) to learn about the proposed instream flow
rules for Washington's Skagit River will be held 12 October at 1900 at the
Skagit Valley Community College, Room F101 Ford Hall, 2405 E. College
Way, Mt. Vernon, Washington. The Washington Department of Ecology has
established minimum instream flows for only 18 of its 62 "Water Resource
Inventory Areas (WIRAs)" or river basins to protect fish and wildlife. Many
of Washington's basins are seriously overappropriated, and these instream
flow rules provide essential caps to irrigation and urban water diversions to
protect and restore ESA listed salmonids. The proposed rule is available
online at Ecology's web site: http://www.ecy.wa.gov. For more information
on these particular rules contact Rod Sakrison, Skagit Basin Watershed Lead,
(425)649-4447 or: rsak461 at ecy.wa.gov. For more information on
Washington States efforts to designate minimum instream flows generally,
see Publication 98-1813-wr, "Setting Instream Flows in Washington State,"
online at: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/biblio/981813wr.html.

2:14/15. OREGON HOOD RIVER BASIN AGRICULTURAL
WATER QUALITY PLAN HEARING 23 OCTOBER: The Oregon
Department of Agriculture will soon adopt an "Agricultural Water Quality
Management Plan" for the Hood River Basin, and is holding a public hearing
on its draft plan 23 October at 1900 at the Mid Columbia Agricultural
Research & Extension Center, 2990 Experimental Station Drive, Hood River,
Oregon 97031. This is one of the so-called "SB1010" plans called for as part
of the Oregon Salmon Plan. For copies of the proposed rules, the plan or
supporting documents, contact Diana Morris at the Oregon Department of
Agriculture, (503)986-4779. The Department of Agricultures SB1010 plans
have been criticized by scientists and agencies as ineffective, but by
landowner groups as too burdensome. The original SB1010, passed by the
Legislature in 1993, was a bill sponsored by the Oregon Farm Bureau as an
alternative to Clean Water Act enforcement. Additional information on the
water quality program can be obtained from the Department's web site at:
http://www.oda.state.or.us .

2:14/16. NORTHERN CALIFORNIA FISH-FRIENDLY FARMING
PROGRAM: The Summer 2000 issue of the California Coast Conservancy's
Coast & Ocean highlights an innovative cooperative program with farmers,
salmon protection organizations and agencies called the "Fish Friendly
Farming" certification program operating in Sonoma and Napa Counties of
northern California. The program allows farmers to develop a conservation
plan for their lands and to receive funding to help pay for fencing, road
repaid and other watershed improvements as well as a certification for their
products. For more information contact the program director, Laurel Marcus
(707)869-2760 or by email to: laurelm at ix.netcome.com. For the Coast &
Ocean Magazine article itself, see: http://www.coastalconservancy.ca.gov/
coast&ocean/summer2000/pages/psix.htm

2:14/17. KLAMATH PAC MEETING 11 OCTOBER: The Klamath
Provincial Advisory Committee (PAC) will be meeting beginning 0900 in
Redding, California on 11 October at the Northern California Service Center
Training Room 1, 6101 Airport Road, Redding, California. The PAC is a
citizen's advisory group to the federal agencies within the Klamath Basin
organized under the Northwest Forest Plan. For more information, prior
minutes or to receive the agenda package, contact Constance Hendryx at
(530)468-1281 or by email at: chendryx at fs.fed.us

2:14/18. CALIFORNIA COASTAL COMMISSION MEETING 10-
12 OCTOBER: The California Coastal Commission has a packed agenda for
its 10-12 October meeting at the Oceanside City Council Chambers, 300
North Coast Highway, Oceanside, California. For more information or to get
on their agenda mailing list contact the Coastal Commission at 45 Fremont
Street, suite 2000, San Francisco, CA 94105-2219 (415)904-5200 or check
their web site at: http://www.coastal.ca.gov/web/ An agenda and relevant
documents are posted on their web site. The Commission's next meetings
will be 14-17 November in Los Angeles, and 12-15 December in San
Francisco.

2:14/19. ENDANGERED MARINE LIFE: On Sept. 28, 2000, the
2000 International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources
(IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species was released, with a three-fold
increase (from 32 species to 95 species) in critically endangered marine life
listed since the previous 1996 report. The international conservation group
examined the status of 18,000 species and concluded that about 11,046 plant
and animal species in their survey are now in danger of extinction, including
one in ever four mammals and one in every eight birds. Conservation
scientists have estimated that the current worldwide extinction level is
between 1,000 to 10,000 times higher than natural background rates, mostly
due to human influences. For more details see: http://www.redlist.org.

2:14/20. SNAKE RIVER WATER QUALITY/QUANTITY
SCORECARD: On Sept. 1, American Rivers released its annual evaluation
of river conditions for the Snake and Columbia Rivers, concluding that
federal dam managers generally failed to meet legally mandated river
conditions for water quantity and water temperature. On the Snake River,
managers failed to meet spring water quantity targets 77% of the time and
summer water quantity targets 97% of the time. In addition, the Clean Water
Act standard for summer water temperature was exceeded more than 50% of
the time. Columbia mainstem conditions were also poor.
See: http://www.americanrivers.org/
template2.asp?cat=2&page=267&id=2295&filter=249

2:14/21. LOUTH BAY, AUSTRALIA TUNA FARM CHALLENGE
UPHELD: On 3 October, South Australia's Environment, Resources and
Development Court (ERDC) upheld the Conservation Council of South
Australia's legal challenge to the Louth Bay Southern Blue Fin Tuna farms,
near Pt Lincoln, Australia. The Conservation Council predicts that its Court
victory will have major implications for the Australian Primary Industries
Minister's plans for a new Aquaculture Act. The Conservation Council of
South Australia case challenged major environmental deficiencies in the
management of tuna aquaculture in South Australia, in an effort to reform
antiquated aquaculture laws. "Today the ERDC has upheld its original
decision, that tuna farming is not being managed sustainably by the South
Australia Government," said Ms Michelle Grady of the Conservation
Council. The farm fish industry is widely perceived as threatening wild fish
stocks through transmission of disease and genetic pollution. Further
information contact: Michelle Grady, CCSA Executive Officer (Australia)
0417 879 439, or by email: executive at ccsa.asn.au .

NEWS, COMMENTS, CORRECTIONS: Submit your news items,
comments or any corrections to Natasha Benjamin, Editor at:
ifrfish at aol.com or call the IFR office with the news and a source at either:
(415) 561-FISH (Southwest Office) or (541) 689-2000 (Northwest Office).

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