[acn-l] ~~> FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 3/2/00 <~~ (fwd)

peter.unmack at asu.edu
Mon, 06 Mar 2000 10:42:45 -0700 (MST)

G'day folks

I have been forwarding these fishlink sublegals out most weeks. To post to
ACN-L one has to be a member of the list (which the original sender of these
is not). Does anyone actual value these or should I not bother forwarding
them along? It typically gets sent out to a whole bunch of lists. If people
actually appreciate recieving this via ACN-L please email me privately at
peter.unmack at asu.edu, otherwise I won't bother forwarding them along.

Cheers
Peter Unmack

From: FISH1IFR at aol.com
Date: Mon, 6 Mar 2000 00:11:21 EST
Subject: ~~> FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 3/2/00 <~~
To: AFS at wyoming.com, ACN-L at pinetree.org, crab-l at ios.bc.ca,
FishingForum at onelist.com, fishhabitat at mail.orst.edu,
oceancoalition at onelist.com, salmon at nw1.riverdale.k12.or.us

<<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>>
~~> FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 3/2/00 <~~
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A WEEKLY QUOTA OF FISHERY SHORTS CAUGHT AND
LANDED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR FISHERIES RESOURCES
AND THE PACIFIC COAST FEDERATION OF FISHERMEN'S
ASSOCIATIONS

VOL 1, NO. 9 3 March 2000

<<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>>


PLANS FOR NEW ZEALAND'S GMO "FRANKENFISH" KING
SALMON NIXED: The Associated Press reported on 26 February that
New Zealand King Salmon Co. Ltd. has agreed to kill all of its genetically
engineered (or "GMO" - genetically modified organism) king salmon
following a controversy involving leaked secret documents, deformed fish
heads, and monster salmon. The company made the decision after it
introduced an additional growth hormone gene into chinook salmon and
passed the trait down three generations. The fish receiving the new
growth hormone gene grew three times faster than the normal rate. The
genetically modified salmon, according to the company, could grow up to
550 pounds. The company said it had killed and disposed of all the
genetically engineered fish, following outcries about the fish getting
loose in the wild - as farm salmon have done everywhere in the world.
The experimental work was halted when the New Zealand government
began an inquiry into the project. New Zealand King Salmon Ltd, said,
however, it would retain frozen sperm from the genetically modified
salmon "at a secure location" so it could be available to the company in
the future. In addition to the Associated Press story of the 26th, there is
also an article, "Make Way For Frankenfish," in the most recent issue of
Time magazine (6 March, pp.62-63). This article on what happens to wild
salmon if the GMO's get loose, can be viewed at the publication's website:
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,39961,00.html .

CALIFORNIA'S INDUSTRIAL WELFARE COMMISSION
CONSIDERS MINIMUM WAGE, OVERTIME RULES FOR FISHING
INDUSTRY. On Friday, 25 February, California's Industrial Welfare
Commission (IWC) held its first hearing in its deliberations on whether or
not to impose minimum wage, overtime, or both, requirements to the
commercial fishing and charter fishing boat industries. In California, and
most other states, the fishing industry has been exempt from these hourly
labor rules where crew members are paid a percentage of the catch and not
by the hour. Under AB 60, passed last year by the California Legislature,
the exemptions provided certain industries, including fishing, from
minimum wage and overtime rules were dropped and the issue of whether
to continue exemptions, or craft special rules, was left to the IWC.

Testifying Friday in favor of continuing the exemption were the
Sportfishing Association of California and the Golden Gate Fishermen's
Associations, representing charter boat operators, and PCFFA
representing owner-operators in the small to medium size fishing boat
fleet. The IWC has said it will continue discussions with the two
industries in coming to a decision on whether to issue an exemption or
take other action. For a copy of the PCFFA testimony offered to the Joint
Committee on Fisheries & Aquaculture on this issue, go to PCFFA/IFR's
website: http://www.pond.net/~pcffa. For more information on the IWC
hearings on this issue, visit the Commission's website at:
http://www.dir.ca.gov/iwc .

RUSSIAN FISHERIES JOURNAL FEATURES ARTICLES ON
ALASKAN FISHERIES, US FISHING EFFORTS TO STOP
OFFSHORE OIL DRILLING: The latest issue of the Russian fisheries
publication, The Northern Pacific Journal, features articles (in English as
well as Russian) on the Alaskan fishery and the efforts to save
Kamchatka's salmon resource. An earlier issue featured an article by
PCFFA (in Russian) on the objections raised by U.S. west coast fishermen
to offshore oil drilling. For more information on the most recent issue or
for information on how to receive back issues or subscribe, contact:
Sergey Vakhrin, Editor in Chief of The Northern Pacific Journal, at:
vakhrin at rybvod.kamchatcka.su.

NEW WEBSITES ON FISHERIES INFORMATION: A new website
opened in February for the seafood industry called Fishmonger.com. To
get more information, call (877)467-9100 or e-mail:
customerservice at fishmonger.com. or visit their website at:
http://www.fishmonger.com .

SEAWEB has also announced its new aquaculture clearinghouse
website. The clearinghouse is to provide information on aquaculture's
environmental impacts and information on aquaculture generally. The
site is: http://www.seaweb.org/campaign/sacc/salmoncalendar.html. They
also have a newsletter online called "FishFarmOpen FF List"; to subscribe
e-mail: bmott at seaweb.org; the website is:
http://www.seaweb.org/campaigns/sac.

MONTEREY AQUARIUM UPDATES "SEAFOOD WATCH
CHART": On 17 February, the Monterey Bay Aquarium released its
updated "Seafood Watch Chart" which categorizes most popular types of
fish and seafood into three classes - "Best Choices," "Proceed with
Caution," and "Avoid." This guide was developed by its scientists on what
consumers, concerned with sustainable fisheries, should look for. The
Aquarium's list of fish "buys and avoids" is one of the nation's more
comprehensive set of consumer fish and seafood recommendations. In the
"Best Choices" category are: Alaska and California wild salmon; Pacific
Albacore/Tombo Tuna; Market Squid (Calamari) from the Pacific; farmed
Catfish; Dungeness crab; farmed clams; Pacific halibut; farmed mussels;
Mahi-Mahi; New Zealand Cod (Hoki); farmed oysters; and farmed striped
bass. For more information on the Seafood Watch Chart, visit the
Aquarium's website at:
http://www.mbayaq.org/efc/efc_oc/seafood_chart.html.

COMPREHENSIVE STUDY PLANNED OF WEST COAST'S MOST
IMPORTANT ESTUARY: The California Academy Sciences has
announced this past week plans for the first comprehensive survey of the
marine life of San Francisco Bay since the beginning of the 20th Century.
San Francisco Bay is biologically the most important estuary on the west
coast of North and South America, but is now highly urbanized with
it original shoreline reduced nearly thirty percent by filling. It has been
filled by as much as 15 feet on its bottom from sediments from 19th
Century hydraulic mining in the Sierras. Massive changes have also
occurred from dredging and dumping of dredged spoils, diking and filing
of wetlands, and annual reductions in fresh water inflow by a much as 50
percent in some years. More than 200 non-native species have been
found in San Francisco Bay. Nevertheless, this bay remains the gateway
between the Pacific and the Sierras for the west coast's most productive
chinook salmon population, it is home to the nation's only urban
commercial fishery - the herring roe fishery, and is a nursery, albeit
heavily impacted, for Dungeness crab.

The 4-year study planned by the Academy of Sciences is called San
Francisco Bay 2K and is expected to compliment the billion dollar plus
state-federal program, CalFed, aimed at restoring the Bay and Delta. It
is also expected to dovetail with a proposal by IFR for oyster and
Dungeness crab restoration in the Bay and efforts to develop a program
for controlling, if not eradicating, such non-native species as the Chinese
Mitten crab. For more information, visit the Academy's website at:
http://www.ca.academy.org.

PFMC CONSIDERS LIMITS ON OPEN ACCESS PACIFIC
GROUNDFISH FISHERY: The Pacific Fisheries Management Council
(PFMC) is considering instituting a control date for the open access
portion of the groundfish fishery off the coast of Washington, Oregon and
California. The date would be 5 November 1999. This means that vessels
entering the fishery after 5 November 1999 may be subject to restrictions
different from those that apply to vessels in the fishery prior to this date.
For more information contact the PFMC at (503) 326-6352. Comments
on this action are due, in writing, by 13 March. They should be addressed
to: Mr. Jim Lone, Chairman, PFMC, 2130 SW Fifth Ave., Suite 224,
Portland, OR 97201.

ESA SUIT FILED AGAINST CALIFORNIA FORESTRY AGENCY
FOR FAILURE TO ADOPT RULES TO PROTECT COHO: On 1 March,
a coalition of 19 environmental, Native American and fishing groups,
including PCFFA, filed suit in U.S. District Court in San Francisco
charging the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection and the
California Board of Forestry with permitting logging operations that kill
threatened coho (silver) salmon in northern California watersheds. The
suit, filed pursuant to the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA), alleges
that officials failed to change the state's logging rules to protect the
listed fish as required by law. In July 1999, the Board's Science Review
Panel, which included timber industry representatives, concluded that the
State's existing timber harvest rules are inadequate to protect the coho and
other salmon. To date, the State has taken no action to change the rules
and it is unlikely the Board of Forestry will act when it next meets on 14
March because of the number of unfilled seats currently on that body. The
National Marine Fisheries Service has already announced it plans on
listing steelhead in the Northern California ESU because the State reneged
on its agreement to change its logging rules. For more information on the
lawsuit, visit the Environmental Protection Information Center's (EPIC)
website at: http://www.wildcalifornia.org.

CALIFORNIA TMDLs LAWSUIT GAINS NEW INTERVENORS,
HEARING SET FOR 23 MARCH: Two new intervenors have joined on
the side of the California Farm Bureau's challenge to northern California
TMDLs in the Prosolino v. Marcus case. They are the California Forestry
Association (representing the timber industry) and the American Forest &
Paper Association. These intervenors also seek to overturn the TMDL
(total maximum daily loading) standards being established, pursuant to the
federal Clean Water Act, for most important northern California salmon
streams. The TMDLs now being implemented by the State are pursuant
to settlement of a lawsuit brought by fishing and environmental groups
three years ago against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
PCFFA v Marcus, to establish such standards. TMDLs are quantitative
plans for achieving water quality standards in polluted (may be sediment
or temperature) waters not expected to meet those standards under
existing water pollution control programs. The next round of briefings in
the Prosolino case, that specifically challenges the TMDL for the Garcia
River, is scheduled for 23 March in U.S. District Court in San Francisco
before Judge William Alsup.

For those interested in TMDLs, the Extension Service of the University
of California/Davis is sponsoring a one-day conference on 3 April,
"California Watersheds 2000: The TMDL Challenge." The cost of the
conference is $180. For more information, call (800)752-0881. In
December, PCFFA jointly sponsored a workshop in San Francisco with
the University of Wisconsin on TMDLs.

WATER SUBSIDIES FOR AGRICULTURAL CONTRACTORS:
On 17 February, the Department of Interior (DOI) announced it's decision
to use $10 million taxpayer dollars to buy non-CVP (Central Valley
Project) water for agricultural water service contractors. This would
essentially be "make-up" water for the water that is legally slated for fish
and wildlife restoration as per the 1992 Central Valley Project
Improvement Act (CVPIA), section 3406(b)(2). According to the Natural
Resources Defense Council's (NRDC) Senior Policy Analyst, Barry
Nelson, in addition to being an unprecedented subsidy using taxpayer
money, and a contradiction of the CALFED processes' "Beneficiaries Pay
Principle," there was also no public comment period. For more
information please contact Barry Nelson at NRDC (415) 777-0220.

NEW AND "BETTER" DESIGN FOR TURTLE EXCLUDER
DEVICES (TEDs): The Texas Marine Advisory Service announced, last
month, a solution to a flaw in the original design of TEDs used in shrimp
trawls. Instead of the traditional nylon netting they are now using a
stronger, high-density polyethylene netting which reduces stretching. This
in turn keeps the shrimp trawl grill in proper alignment and reduces losses
of shrimp during the fishing effort.

MORE DAM BUSTERS - BUSH OPPOSES BREACHING SNAKE
RIVER DAMS: Two Dams on the Elwha River in Washington have
become public property this week. The Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams,
bought from the private sector for $29.5 million (the price was set by
Congress in the Elwha River Ecosystem & Fisheries Restoration Act of
1992) will be in the hands of the National Park Service until a long-term
manager is identified and a further review of what is to be done with the
dams is conducted.

In Canadian News, British Columbia's Government has identified the
first large-scale dam for demolition. The Theodosia River was once home
to one of Georgia Straight's most abundant runs of salmon, but since
the Dam was built on it in 1956, that population has collapsed.

Despite scientific evidence and overwhelming support from fishing and
conservation groups for their removal, Texas Governor George W. Bush
promised that the four dams on the Lower Snake River would not
be breached to save salmon runs if he is elected president. In the
meantime, a press conference has been scheduled for 9 March at the
National Press Club in Washington D.C., put on by some of the
organizations involved in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Campaign, to
discuss removal of the four Snake River dams. These structures have
drastically affected runs of salmon in Washington, Oregon and Idaho, and
this is the year that the Clinton-Gore Administration is going to have to
decide whether to remove the dams as part of the salmon recovery plan.
The comment period on these dams ends on 31 March. For more
information, go to http://www.removedams.org .

GOT NEWS?: Submit news items to Molly Thomas, editor at:
<ifrfish at aol.com> or call the IFR office with the news and a source at
either: (415) 561-FISH (Southwest Office) or (541) 689-2000 (Northwest
Office).

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