[acn-l] Influence of Inland Activities on Coastal Activities - Call

Dean Staff (dstaff at home.com)
Fri, 24 Dec 1999 23:39:35 -0500

I thought this might be of interest to some...

Cheers
Dean

------- Forwarded message follows -------

Apologies for Multiple Listings

Land Meets Water
Call for Papers
InterCoast Newsletter
A Newsletter for Coastal Practitioners

Population growth, coastal development, resource demand, climate and natural
coastal processes all threaten coastal marine environments. Of these,=
nearly
all are human induced pressures (from physical alterations of the coastal
environment to impacts from pollution and other human activities). The
important element here is that activities far from the coast, but within the
watershed, can significantly impact the coastal region, yet be invisible to
those it affects.

Some of these activities invisible to coastal communities include conversion=
of
open land and forest to activities that provide economic growth; direct
discharges from municipal and industrial sources; indirect discharges,
including sediments, nutrients and other uncontrollable releases; and=
ecosystem
alterations such as dams, flood control channels and dredging. All these
activities, though not necessarily harmful at the source, travel downstream=
and
have profound impacts on the coastal environment. =20

The realization that upstream activities adversely affect the coastal
environment is not new. Nevertheless, historically coastal managers have
looked to manage only activities in their yards and backyards, not=
activities
in another neighborhood that is well out of their influence. It is only
recently that coastal managers have seriously looked at upstream activities=
and
are trying to influence these activities in an effort to protect their=
coastal
environment. This is integrated coastal management at its best. =20

This issue of InterCoast will look at these problems, how they can be
identified and documented, and ultimately how they can be managed. Needless=
to
say, management is not always effective; InterCoast will explore this and=
try
to deliver some lessons learned.

InterCoast invites coastal practitioners to contribute articles on this and
other subjects. (Articles on all coastal management issues are welcome.)
InterCoast also includes a section, =93Reports from the Field,=94 that=
provides
project summaries, initiatives and other information of interest to coastal
managers worldwide.=20

Main articles are typically one to two pages (750-1,300 words); Reports from
the Field are 250-500 words. To contribute or request information, contact
InterCoast=92s managing editor, No=EBlle F. Lewis, Coastal Resources Center,
University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI 02882 USA. Tel: 401-874-6870.=
Fax:
401-789-4670. E-mail: noelle at gso.uri.edu. Website: http//:crc.uri.edu.=20
Articles can be submitted electronically.=20

Deadline: 11 February 2000.=20

Noelle F. Lewis, Managing Editor, InterCoast Newsletter
Coastal Resources Center, University of Rhode Island =20
Box 53 =20
Narragansett, RI 02882 USA
E-mail: noelle at gso.uri.edu
Tel: 401-874-6870 [me or voice] or 401-874-6224 [main]
FAX: 401-789-4670

InterCoast Website: http://crc.uri.edu/comm/htmlpubs/ic/index.html

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Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Apologies for Multiple Listings

Land Meets Water
Call for Papers
InterCoast Newsletter
A Newsletter for Coastal Practitioners

Population growth, coastal development, resource demand, climate and natural coastal processes all threaten coastal marine environments.  Of these, nearly all are human induced pressures (from physical alterations of the coastal environment to impacts from pollution and other human activities).  The important element here is that activities far from the coast, but within the watershed, can significantly impact the coastal region, yet be invisible to those it affects.

Some of these activities invisible to coastal communities include conversion of open land and forest to activities that provide economic growth; direct discharges from municipal and industrial sources; indirect discharges, including sediments, nutrients and other uncontrollable releases; and ecosystem alterations such as dams, flood control channels and dredging.  All these activities, though not necessarily harmful at the source, travel downstream and have profound impacts on the coastal environment. 

The realization that upstream activities adversely affect the coastal environment is not new.  Nevertheless, historically coastal managers have looked to manage only activities in their yards and backyards, not activities in another neighborhood that is well out of their influence.  It is only recently that coastal managers have seriously looked at upstream activities and are trying to influence these activities in an effort to protect their coastal environment.  This is integrated coastal management at its best. 

This issue of InterCoast will look at these problems, how they can be identified and documented, and ultimately how they can be managed.  Needless to say, management is not always effective; InterCoast will explore this and try to deliver some lessons learned.

InterCoast invites coastal practitioners to contribute articles on this and other subjects.  (Articles on all coastal management issues are welcome.) InterCoast also includes a section, =93Reports from the Field,=94 that provides project summaries, initiatives and other information of interest to coastal managers worldwide.

Main articles are typically one to two pages (750-1,300 words); Reports from the Field are 250-500 words.  To contribute or request information, contact InterCoast=92s managing editor, No=EBlle F. Lewis, Coastal Resources Center, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI 02882 USA. Tel: 401-874-6870. Fax: 401-789-4670. E-mail: noelle at gso.uri.edu. Website: http//:crc.uri.edu.  Articles can be submitted electronically.

Deadline: 11 February 2000.


Noelle F. Lewis, Managing Editor, InterCoast Newsletter
Coastal Resources Center, University of Rhode Island         
Box 53         =20
Narragansett, RI 02882  USA
E-mail: noelle at gso.uri.edu
Tel: 401-874-6870 [me or voice] or 401-874-6224 [main]
FAX: 401-789-4670

InterCoast Website: http://crc.uri.edu/comm/htmlpubs/ic/index.html

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------- End of forwarded message -------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Dean Staff Kanata On. Canada
dstaff at home.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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